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Uskglass, John

Discussion in 'Citizens' started by John Uskglass, Dec 10, 2018.

  1. John Uskglass

    John Uskglass Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell

    Posts:
    231
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Magician King
    Race:
    Human (Magician)
    Age:
    15
    Alignment:
    Lawful Neutral
    John Uskglass
    The rain made a door for me and I went through it;
    The stones made a throne for me and I sat upon it;
    Three kingdoms were given to me to be mine forever;
    England was given to me to be mine forever.

    [​IMG]
    Played by Nessa

    Fandom: Jonathan Stange and Mr. Norrell
    Age: 15
    Species: Human Magician
    Gender: Male
    Canon Point: While establishing his realm in England
    NPC Companions: N/A

    SKILLS & ABILITIES

    Much has been said of the Aurate magicians, those who flourished during England's golden age of magic, and more still has been said of the foremost amongst these worthies, John Uskglass, The Raven King. A man surrounded by legend, his greatness as a magician is so renown it has been said of him that “[he] could, had he so desired, have wrested Merlin from the tree, spun the old gentleman on his head and put him back in again.” Indeed, the history of English Magic is bound with the Raven King: many of England's greatest magicians can trace their knowledge, however indirectly, back to him, and the end of his reign marks the beginning of magic's decline. At fourteen he forged a system of magic that would forever change the face of English Magic, a system of magic that is continued in use up to 400 years later.

    Magic in itself, of course, is at once both the simplest and perhaps, the most complicated things in the world.There has been much debate and discussion over magic's true nature, and to fully comprehend it's many intricacies and complexities takes a lifetime of study. Numerous interpretations of spells and approaches to achieve the desired effect – whatever that may be – exist, the shear number of possible permutations of a spell making magic all the more difficult. At it's core, however, magic is a form of conversation and communication with the surrounding world: The Wind, The Rain, The Hills and the Stars, and on and on. Everything in nature has it's own concerns and purposes, and Magic is the art of persuading such personages towards the Magician's own desires. Being raised by Fairies, John Uskgass has learned to to communicate directly to all things in nature, and can thus do his magic directly through these means.

    As stated previously, the much vaunted skill of the Raven King and the tales of his deeds have become legendary. During his reign, his magic has allowed him to accomplish such feats as varied and impressive as banishing Winter from his realm for four years, causing the moon to vanish from the sky and pass through all of the rivers and lakes in England, and causing the citizens of his realm to dream the same dream for thirty nights: building a tall black tower that some have claimed served as a defense against the Black Death. Raising and communing with the dead, visiting others in dreams and effecting them, appearing and disappearing from thin air, conjuring objects, spells of protection and healing, enchanting objects and disenchanting them, even capturing emotional and mental states – envy, lust, joy, love and madness – in certain items, like an insect trapped in amber, are among only some of the talents enjoyed by magicians like the Raven King. He has secured alliances with a host of beings in order to do so, from the birds and beasts that walk the earth, to all manner of trees in the forest, to the winds and the earth.

    The ritualized manner of many spells, from simple things things like summoning or scrying, to larger things such as protecting half of a country from the Black Plague, means that these spells require time and the right circumstances in order to do. Those enchantments with larger effects take more time and more preparation in order to accomplish and when combined with the effect Pandora itself has had on his magic, are often more unreliable than they were previously, leading to the possibility of nothing happening at all, or worse even, backfire.

    Of course, for all of his magical talents, the more “mundane” skills – if they can be called as such – possessed by John Uskglass cannot be underestimated either. Already the King of a realm in Faerie by the time he set his sights upon England, and having the strength of will in order to bind a Fairy Host – Fairies being a usually feckless and indolent folk – into a force that managed to conquer half of England, it is clear that the Raven King is a natural born leader. He has a strong sense of purposefulness that drives him on, and is a clever young man, skilled in strategy.

    WEAKNESSES


    Despite all of his fame as England's greatest magician, The Raven King is, at his core, still very much human and being so may suffer from all of the ills that effect humanity. Injury, illness, and even death are all things he is still susceptible to. He is not an all-knowing, all-powerful being, and indeed, in later years, especially amongst Englishmen from the North, tales of the Raven King's follies are among the most popular. He can be, and has been out-witted and overpowered by others.

    Raised and educated among Fairies, even with his human linage John Uskglass's way of thinking tends to skew more towards that of one of the Fair Folk. He is still perfectly capable of rational thinking, and is more organized, more purposeful and more practical than a Fairy, yet at the same time he is just as likely to allow his emotions to take control, be it in anger – as when he raised from the dead the son of a man who was conspiring against him, and proceeded to brutally question and beat the man – or in love, such as on one occasion where he fell in love with a Cornish witch and nearly handed over his entire kingdom and all of his powers to her. Indeed, as he is only a fifteen-year-old boy, still growing and dealing with the tumult of emotions that comes with this point in his life, it seems such incidents are only to be more likely now than ever.

    As he was raised among Fairies, magic is a way of life to John Uskglass. To use magic is as natural to him as breathing, and to be stripped of his magic would be to him like having his air supply cut off. There are several items that work as prophylactics against magic, and can interfere with and even cancel out the effects of the Raven King's magic. The color red is a rather minor example of this. Some more powerful wards against magic include salt, items of religious significance, and rowan wood. Indeed, there are tales of Fairies being rendered powerless and killed in Rowan forests, and thus is can be extrapolated that such a place would have the same effect on the Raven King. Iron is a particularly strong against magic, and is indeed magically inert to the point where the very idea of it has been invoked in ancient Fairy magics meant to disenchant others to great effect.


    FREEFORM

    The history of the Raven King is an obscure and muddled period in time, especially in it's early years. By his own telling, John Uskglass was originally the son of a family of Norman nobility, living in the north of England. When an enemy of the family, Hubert de Cotentin, stole their lands and killed several members of the family, John Uskglass the elder – The Raven King's father – appealed to King William II in order to receive justice, but he received none, and was later murdered. The Raven King himself, still a child as yet unchristened, was taken by Hubert's men and left to die in the woods. It was here that he was found by the Daoine Sidhe, the Fairies, and taken to live with them. It is unclear how much truth lies in this tale, although it is generally the most widely accepted version of events. Only being a babe in the cradle at the time, he would have no memory of such things himself, and would have had to have heard the tale from some outside source. One of his fairy captors might have told him the story as he was growing up. Perhaps parts are true, perhaps other pieces are exaggerations or made up purely to make it all a bit more interesting. Knowing of the Fair Folk and their ways it is not an impossible stretch of the imagination to suggest that the King's true history was entirely forgotten and rather than saying so, this was the one presented to him so as to not leave him without a past entirely. Whatever the case,it is clear the Raven King himself believed it, and it set the fire of vengeance within his heart, a vengeance which would later be fulfilled with his conquest of northern England.

    John Uskglass began his childhood in the fairy brugh of his youth as a slave to his captors. In time however, he quickly grew to become the favorite foster child of the Fairy King most humans call Oberon, and began his magical education.He was named in the Fairy language with a name that means starling. By the age of 14 he was already a King in his own right.

    In the year 1110, when the Raven King and his army first appeared outside of Penlaw, 25 miles northwest of Newcastle. By December of that year the Fairy Host had taken Newcastle and Durham and had come to a small village, a settlement called Allendale. Here was where the true nature of the Raven King's army was recognized, for one of the town's maidens had approached the army, and was found the next day dead in the snow, having sweat out all of her blood after dancing with one of the Sidhe. Much to the surprise of those watching events unfold, however, incidents such as this one proved rare over the course of the entire campaign. Indeed, the Fairy Host acted with a purposefulness completely uncharacteristic to their kind, usually ascribed in full to their leadership by the Raven King. By Christmas York, Lancaster, and Carlisle were taken, and in January, King Henry I gathered an army of his own and met the Fairy host at the Trent River in battle. Due to the magic possessed by the Sidhe, the battle was short and King Henry lost.

    When it became clear to him that he had been defeated. King Henry and his nobles waited for a King or Chieftain to emerge from amongst the Sidhe and make himself known. The Fairy Host parted, and out stepped a young man, only of about fifteen years, if that. He was dressed as the rest of his army was, in ragged, black clothing of rough wool. He spoke neither English or French, but instead only a dialect of Faerie. Yet for all that he was as pale and handsome and as solemn faced as those who he commanded, it was clear that this young man was human.

    By the standards of the Norman knights and nobility that he had met that day he was hardly civilized. When King Henry and John Uskglass met to divide England between themselves, Henry sat upon a wooden bench and drank wine from a silver goblet, while John Uskglass sat on the floor drinking ewe's milk from a stone cup. The boy had never seen a spoon before, nor a chair nor even a wax candle, such things were not to be found in fairy brughs at the time. And during the proceedings, much of King Henry's court was shocked as they watched a member of the Fairy Host lean over to pluck lice out of the boy's filthy hair. He was, for all intents and purposes, a thing of the wild, as much as any bird, beast, or Fairy.

    Though he could have had all of England at the mercy of his Fairy Host, John Uskglass had settled it in his mind that the lands between the Tweed and Trent rivers were just recompense for the failure of the Norman kings to avenge his family, and that in itself speaks to the Character of the Raven King, showing a sense of moral restraint and justice – as much as his Fairy upbringing has twisted it.

    In the months that followed the Raven King set about establishing his realm. He made alliances on behalf of his subjects with the trees and the earth, the waterways and winds, the stars and the rain and the very foundations of England itself that they might be able to use magic. And he began to teach them. This was out of no generosity of his own, of course, but through mere practicality. He had both Fairies and Humans as his subjects, and if they practiced magic together they might be more easily brought together as one people.

    Thus it was that the Raven King was making one of these alliances when he was taken , black vines reaching out from the earth to drag him under to a place even he could not have imagined existing.
     
    #1 John Uskglass, Dec 10, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2018
    Crystal Peak likes this.
  2. John Uskglass

    John Uskglass Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell

    Posts:
    231
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Magician King
    Race:
    Human (Magician)
    Age:
    15
    Alignment:
    Lawful Neutral
    Aaaand we're back to this again. xD I am weak and have been seeing too many plots that would be interesting with young!John lately so...yeah. Edits are done, do y'all's thing :)
     
  3. Kitty

    Kitty help, i'm FEELING
    Application Division

    Posts:
    539
    Gender:
    female
    Race:
    Dragon
    Age:
    Ageless
    your application is
    ACCEPTED

    [​IMG]

    homg prettyyyyyyyyy

    john's lookin good! really good ;) have fun with him nessa!​